Posts tagged “geoffrey keen

The Living Daylights (1987)

James Bond film #15 (Timothy Dalton Bond)

The Living Daylights (1987)

The Living Daylights is the first Bond film with Timothy Dalton, a man who would certainly be the most forgotten Bond if it weren’t for Mr. George Lazenby. While Roger Moore altered Bond to make him more comical and suave, Dalton dials back the self-awareness and plays the role more like a serious spy. It’s not a bad idea, and we’ll see that approach work well when we get to Daniel Craig in Casino Royale, but there’s very obvious tension on display in this film between Dalton’s new take and the material’s inability to adapt alongside him.

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A View to a Kill (1985)

James Bond film #14 (Roger Moore Bond)

A View to a Kill (1985)

A View to a Kill marks the 7th and final appearance of Roger Moore as James Bond, Agent 007. It’s been a fun ride that’s lasted 12 years, but as anyone who watches this film could tell you, Moore is 57 years old and looking it. It’s time for some new blood, but not before Moore takes down Christopher Walken, co-starring as the rich and insane Max Zorin. Despite the promise that an unhinged Walken might suggest, A View to a Kill is as worn-out and tired as its leading man.

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Octopussy (1983)

James Bond film #13 (Roger Moore Bond)

Octopussy (1983)

The Bond series becomes a baker’s dozen with 1983’s Octopussy (13), a movie which may very well win the “Worst Title Ever” award. The film itself isn’t so great either, excelling only in setting and severely lacking in story. A Soviet general who’s something like a mix between Dr. Strangelove and Buck Turgidson is attempting to expand the USSR’s borders into Europe through a convoluted disarmament plan. Somehow, an Afghan prince and his unfortunately named business associate get involved, and Bond ends up dressing like a clown. If it weren’t for the absurd name, this subpar Bond film would be long-forgotten by now.

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For Your Eyes Only (1981)

James Bond film #12 (Roger Moore Bond)

For Your Eyes Only (1981)

For Your Eyes Only (12) sees James Bond bursting into the ’80s, and with the new decade, the series takes another turn off its well-worn path. For the past few films, the Bond series has been digging itself into the ground as it went further and further into the realm of gadgetry and comic relief. Moore’s tenure has so far seen psychic mediums, tri-nippled assassins, underwater fortresses, and giant space stations, and while the Connery Bond films always had their own silly moments (like the jetpack in Thunderball (4) or all of Diamonds Are Forever (7)), they never got quite as outlandish as Moore’s. For Your Eyes Only (12) puts the brakes on crazy-town Bond, scaling back the theatrics and getting much grittier than he’s been in a long time. In this film, Bond tries to acquire a missile command system while getting manipulated and attacked by shady Greek businessmen. Fighting alongside him is Melina Havelock, a vigilante with a crossbow seeking vengeance on whoever murdered her parents. Though it’s different in tone than what we’re used to, the level-headedness of For Your Eyes (12) results in a fully satisfying, if not entirely memorable, Bond film.

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The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

James Bond film #10 (Roger Moore Bond)

The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

Released in 1977, The Spy Who Loved Me comes three years after The Man With the Golden Gun, the longest gap between Bond films so far. The series benefits from this brief hiatus – instead of feeling like the same movie we’ve seen nine times already, there’s something fresh to this film. Starting with an amazing pre-credits scene and never letting up, The Spy Who Loves Me brings  a new standard of excitement and artistry to a series 10 films deep.

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