Posts tagged “albert r. broccoli

The World is Not Enough (1999)

James Bond film #19 (Pierce Brosnan Bond)

The World is Not Enough (1999)

 Pierce Brosnan returns as James Bond for 1999’s The World Is Not Enough (19), the last Bond of the 20th Century. The action is kicked into overdrive for the 19th Eon Production, the story shirked in favor of big action set pieces and double crossings. In it, Bond goes up against Renard, a Soviet terrorist who can’t feel pain because of a bullet slowly making its way through his brain. Don’t worry, if that’s not unrealistic enough for you, you still get to watch Denise Richards try to play a nuclear physicist. The World Is Not Enough (19) is a roller coaster ride of action scenes that moves so fast you might get lucky and not realize how inane it is until it’s all over.

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Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)

James Bond film #18 (Pierce Brosnan Bond)

Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)

The second Brosnan Bond, Tomorrow Never Dies (18), had quite an act to follow after 1995’s GoldenEye (17). Producers Barbara Broccoli (Albert’s daughter and associate producer for the Dalton movies (15-16)) and Michael G. Wilson (stepson of Albert and producer with him since A View to a Kill (14)) had brought Bond back in a big way; could they manage to do it again? With no more Ian Fleming stories to adapt, an original story was written (also the case with The Spy Who Loved Me (10)), and the story that Bruce Feirstein came up with was a wonderful merger of classic Bond plots and modern global issues. Tomorrow Never Dies (18) continues the modernization of the series that GoldenEye initiated, bringing more of the Bond tropes back for an Information Age update.

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GoldenEye (1995)

James Bond film #17 (Pierce Brosnan Bond)

GoldenEye (1995)

GoldenEye was released in 1995 after 6 years of a world without Bond, still the longest gap between any two 007 adventures. Because of the delay and all the legal tanglings that caused it, Timothy Dalton opted out of the role and Pierce Brosnan stepped into his place, a man who has come to define James Bond for pretty much all of Generation Y. Also huge is the fact that this is the first post-Cold War Bond, a point referenced to extensively and used to hang the plot on. In a lot of ways, it seems like a reboot of the series; the big change-up in production personnel is clearly evident. GoldenEye brings Bond up to speed in the modern world, finally stepping out of the mold it crafted in the 60s and 70s.

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Licence to Kill (1989)

James Bond film #16 (Timothy Dalton Bond)

Licence to Kill (1989)

If anyone ever wanted to see James Bond in rampage mode, they need look no further than 1989’s Licence to Kill. Running with the darker realism of The Living Daylights (15), Licence to Kill sees Bond going vigilante after a Colombian drug lord destroys Felix Leiter’s life. The film that follows has the most graphic violence of any Bond to date and an almost complete lack of light-hearted moments. It’s the most we’ve ever strayed from the Bond film formula, replacing all the campy elements of the franchise while retaining the spectacular action, and the film excels because of its willingness to stand apart from its predecessors

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The Living Daylights (1987)

James Bond film #15 (Timothy Dalton Bond)

The Living Daylights (1987)

The Living Daylights is the first Bond film with Timothy Dalton, a man who would certainly be the most forgotten Bond if it weren’t for Mr. George Lazenby. While Roger Moore altered Bond to make him more comical and suave, Dalton dials back the self-awareness and plays the role more like a serious spy. It’s not a bad idea, and we’ll see that approach work well when we get to Daniel Craig in Casino Royale, but there’s very obvious tension on display in this film between Dalton’s new take and the material’s inability to adapt alongside him.

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A View to a Kill (1985)

James Bond film #14 (Roger Moore Bond)

A View to a Kill (1985)

A View to a Kill marks the 7th and final appearance of Roger Moore as James Bond, Agent 007. It’s been a fun ride that’s lasted 12 years, but as anyone who watches this film could tell you, Moore is 57 years old and looking it. It’s time for some new blood, but not before Moore takes down Christopher Walken, co-starring as the rich and insane Max Zorin. Despite the promise that an unhinged Walken might suggest, A View to a Kill is as worn-out and tired as its leading man.

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Octopussy (1983)

James Bond film #13 (Roger Moore Bond)

Octopussy (1983)

The Bond series becomes a baker’s dozen with 1983’s Octopussy (13), a movie which may very well win the “Worst Title Ever” award. The film itself isn’t so great either, excelling only in setting and severely lacking in story. A Soviet general who’s something like a mix between Dr. Strangelove and Buck Turgidson is attempting to expand the USSR’s borders into Europe through a convoluted disarmament plan. Somehow, an Afghan prince and his unfortunately named business associate get involved, and Bond ends up dressing like a clown. If it weren’t for the absurd name, this subpar Bond film would be long-forgotten by now.

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For Your Eyes Only (1981)

James Bond film #12 (Roger Moore Bond)

For Your Eyes Only (1981)

For Your Eyes Only (12) sees James Bond bursting into the ’80s, and with the new decade, the series takes another turn off its well-worn path. For the past few films, the Bond series has been digging itself into the ground as it went further and further into the realm of gadgetry and comic relief. Moore’s tenure has so far seen psychic mediums, tri-nippled assassins, underwater fortresses, and giant space stations, and while the Connery Bond films always had their own silly moments (like the jetpack in Thunderball (4) or all of Diamonds Are Forever (7)), they never got quite as outlandish as Moore’s. For Your Eyes Only (12) puts the brakes on crazy-town Bond, scaling back the theatrics and getting much grittier than he’s been in a long time. In this film, Bond tries to acquire a missile command system while getting manipulated and attacked by shady Greek businessmen. Fighting alongside him is Melina Havelock, a vigilante with a crossbow seeking vengeance on whoever murdered her parents. Though it’s different in tone than what we’re used to, the level-headedness of For Your Eyes (12) results in a fully satisfying, if not entirely memorable, Bond film.

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Moonraker (1979)

James Bond film #11 (Roger Moore Bond)

Moonraker (1979)

After the success of Star Wars in 1977, Cubby Broccoli decided to jump in on the emerging science fiction craze and choose Moonraker as the next Eon Productions Bond movie. Roger Moore returns for his fourth Bond film, investigating a stolen space shuttle that leads him to Hugo Drax of Drax Industries. Drax’s plan is very similar to Stromberg’s from The Spy Who Loved Me (10) – he plans to destroy humanity and repopulate the Earth as he sees fit. There are a few slight differences – instead of nukes, he’s planning on using poison, and instead of hiding out underwater, he’s planning on chilling in space during the apocalypse – but this déjà vu is symptomatic of Moonraker‘s tendency to coast on the coattails of its spectacular predecessor.

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The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

James Bond film #10 (Roger Moore Bond)

The Spy Who Loved Me (1977)

Released in 1977, The Spy Who Loved Me comes three years after The Man With the Golden Gun, the longest gap between Bond films so far. The series benefits from this brief hiatus – instead of feeling like the same movie we’ve seen nine times already, there’s something fresh to this film. Starting with an amazing pre-credits scene and never letting up, The Spy Who Loves Me brings  a new standard of excitement and artistry to a series 10 films deep.

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